Friday, September 19, 2014

Vancouver Public Art



During recent years, a wealth of colourful and innovative public art has sprung up around my vibrant hometown of Vancouver, British Columbia. Photographing as much of it as I can has become one of  my latest projects. You can see the results in my new image gallery Vancouver Public Art. Please check back often as it is a work in progress.

A number of the artworks shown in the gallery are part of the Vancouver Biennale, a non-profit endeavour promoting public art. The image above shows the whimsical Giants mural painted by Brazilian graffiti artists Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo (also known as OSGEMEOS) on huge silos at the Ocean Concrete factory on Granville Island. It is their most ambitious mural to date, and they used about 1400 spray-paint cans to create the enormous figures, which were unveiled in September 2014.

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Gung Hay Fat Choy


   

I captured this image of young dragon dancers at the 2014 Chinese New Year Parade in Vancouver's historical Chinatown. This event marked the beginning of the Year of the Horse in the Chinese lunar calendar. Over 50,000 people attended this year's parade. The Chinatown in Vancouver, British Columbia, is one of the largest and oldest in North America. Its colourful streets and alleyways lined with heritage buildings, restaurants, markets, and shops crammed with traditional Chinese goods make Chinatown one of my favourite places to explore with my camera. You can see more images in my Vancouver Chinatown gallery.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Gran Museo del Mundo Maya de Mérida

 
 
I took the image above recently at the new Gran Museo del Mundo Maya or Grand Museum of the Mayan World that opened in September 2012 in the city of Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico. This spectacular venue celebrates the history, cultures, spirituality, and geography of the Mayab,  the land of the ancient and contemporary Maya. Depicted in the photo is a statue of a Maya man using a traditional conch shell horn to summon visitors to the museum. The innovative museum building in the background is modeled after a giant Ceiba tree, which was sacred to the ancient Maya and a symbol of their complex cosmology. The Ceiba tree's roots reach deep into the nine levels of the Mayan Underworld, and its branches extend into the realms of the gods.You will find this image and numerous others of the museum and its exhibits in my Gran Museo del Mundo Maya gallery.

Thursday, January 3, 2013

Stanley Theatre, Vancouver



The Stanley Theatre on Granville Street is one of the few remaining community theatres in the city of Vancouver, British Columbia. This handsome Moorish style art deco building first opened as a movie house in December 1930 and screened films for over sixty years before financial problems forced it to close its doors in 1991. Fortunately, the Stanley escaped commercial redevelopment, and it was renovated as a stage theatre in 1997–1998. The theatre was subsequently designated a protected heritage building, and it now hosts musicals and classical productions from around the globe.

You will find this image in my Vancouver Heritage Buildings gallery. This collection is a work in progress. During the coming months, I plan to photograph more of Vancouver's heritage and other historical buildings, many of which are being threatened by the city's real estate boom and uncaring developers.

Monday, July 23, 2012

Beautiful British Columbia



I consider myself lucky to live on the west coast of British Columbia, Canada. It is without a doubt one of the most beautiful places on the planet. I was on a moving ferry when I took this photo of a sunlit sailboat with the the snow-laced (even in July) peaks of the Coast Mountains towering in the background. Composing the picture proved to be a bit tricky because once all the elements — boat, island, and mountains — in the scene lined up, I had only a couple of seconds to push the shutter. Fortunately, things worked out just the way I had hoped. You will find this image in my Vancouver gallery.

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Ancient Cities of Mexico

I have just published Ancient Cities of Mexico, a print-on-demand book containing some of my favorite black and white infrared-style photos of pre-Hispanic ruins. These images span a period of about 25 years during which I have made more trips to Mexico than I can count. If you decide to watch the book preview below, make sure to click on the "Fullscreen View" icon (bottom right of screen) for optimum viewing.




You will also find these images and many more like them in my Pre-Hispanic Ruins in Black and White gallery.

Friday, June 22, 2012

Eagle and Totem Pole





I was strolling through Vanier Park in the Vancouver neighborhood of Kitsilano one afternoon when I looked up to see a bald eagle perched on top of  the 100-foot-tall Centennial Totem pole that towers over the park. This scene struck me as a potent symbol of British Columbia's native peoples, the rightful owners of the land that the magnificent carving now stands upon. This totem pole is one of two created by Chief Mungo Martin of the Kwakiutl Nation to mark British Columbia's Centennial in 1958. Its twin, which was a gift to Queen Elizabeth II, now graces Windsor Great Park in London, England. You will find this image in my Vancouver gallery.